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English Listening Tip: Watch Movies and TV

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I’m sure that if you study English, you want to improve your listening skills! There are a ton of ways to practice English listening, but one of the best ways is to watch English TV or movies. The reason it’s so good is because it’s fun. This means that you’re likely to keep doing it, especially if you get addicted to watching a favourite TV series.

Keep on reading for how to make the best use of your time when watching English TV or movies. Here are the English listening tips!

Watch Movies and TV to Improve your English Listening

You probably already watch English TV or movies, but with subtitles in your own language. This does not provide you with the maximum benefits. It’s better if you watch without subtitles. This is because your brain will be forced to work much harder.

Points to Consider when Choosing What to Watch

When choosing a TV show or film, there are several points to consider.

  1. Is it interesting to you? You can find lists of “Best Movies to Learn English” all over the internet, but if the films are in genres you don’t like, you are less likely to get much out of it.

  2. Is it something you could watch over and over? Unless your English is advanced, you will learn more each time you watch the same show. So, pick something you will enjoy re-watching as much as you enjoyed watching for the first time.

  3. Accents. Some accents are easier to understand than others. For example, Tom Hanks speaks slowly and clearly, but Sylvester Stallone sounds tired or a little drunk and is more difficult to understand.

  4. Genre. Action movies will be easier to understand, because you can use the visual cues (the action) help you understand. Dramas and romantic comedies will have more “sitting and talking” scenes and more difficult language.

english-listening

Take your English Listening to the Next Level 

You can take watching TV or movies to the next level by studying the transcripts. There is a large selection of movie scripts available to read online for free at IMSDB and TV scripts at Forever Dreaming. This is a fan-created site with a large collection of Friends scripts.

I think watching a series is better than a movie, and watching reality TV is the best. The reason for this is you can get used to the characters’ accents and speech, which makes comprehension easier. With reality TV, you can also hear how people really talk. A quick word of warning! Don’t start pulling people’s hair and throwing things when you are angry– not everything you see on reality TV is true!

YouTube with Subtitles On

If you watch episodes on YouTube, you can turn on the subtitles. Keep in mind that the subtitles aren’t always accurate. Challenge yourself to watch carefully and catch the mistakes. This will help you listen actively, even when there are no comprehension activities to complete.

Eventually, you want to turn off the subtitles, though. There are no subtitles in day to day life! But first, watch this episode of Keeping up with the Kardashians. I saw several mistakes just in the first thirty seconds. How many can you find?

Need more English Listening Tips?

If you liked this English listening tip about watching TV and movies, then you’ll need to get this book: 71 Ways to Practice English Listening: Tips for ESL/EFL Learners. The tip you just read is from this book, and there are 70 more English listening tips just like it. You’ll be listening in English like a pro in no time, whether you’re a beginner, intermediate or advanced student. It really is possible to improve your English listening skills.

Check out the book on Amazon today:

The post English Listening Tip: Watch Movies and TV appeared first on ESL Speaking.


Jackie Bolen: How to Get a University Job In Korea

Amazon
amazon.com/How-Get-University-South-Korea-ebook/dp/B00ORLRP2Y 

My Life! Teaching in a Korean University
eslteacherinkorea.blogspot.com

University Jobs Koreauniversityjobkorea.com

YouTube: youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL0Q8kr18oQIo12jZrwIUdnU4C6eJV5rK


 


Getting Good Photography Advice is Hard. Accepting it is Even Harder!

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Years ago I wrote and subsequently had to delete a great post about online critiques. For some reason the post attracted a lot of spam and I think that later compromised my site. However, it was a great post and you can read it here. At any rate, the point of that article was to explore the idea that the people who are giving critiques or “advice” are sometimes not offering much in a practical sense. So, I was pleasantly surprised when I got exactly what I was looking for from none other than the legendary Jared Polin.

The thing is that there are people out there that just want to rip you a new one. Even if you want a solid critique they will pick apart your image until you wish that you had never taken it. When I reread that old article, I realized that nothing much has changed in the 4 years since I wrote it. Except for the fact that I am seeking advice. The trouble is trying to find “good” advice and by that I mean stuff that I can actually use to improve my photography and sales.

So jump to the other week when I asked Jared Polin of Fro Knows Photo a very direct question. His answer amazed me in the way that it was so direct and to the point. He took the time to actually search for my stuff and really gave it some thought. At first, I was a little scared, but then I realized that this was exactly what I needed to hear. Not to mention that Jared knows how to give a “critiquee mccritiquerson” meaning that it is fair and lacks the obvious jabs at a person’s character or business skills that some people throw in just to be dicks.

After watching this segment and realizing that I really have to up my game, I got a ton of great suggestions. I immediately took Jared’s advice and started a youtube channel and posted a video. I was nervous at first but the overall thing that I took from this was that I had to get my name out there… even further. The reason being is that the area that I am pushing towards is extremely saturated. I thought that having a masters in education could set me apart but the reality is that people also want to be entertained. So if your videos are entertaining as much as they are informative, then you onto something. However, that is something that I will need to work on in the future.

Now, let’s talk about the other side of the coin. There are a lot of “gurus” out there peddling digital snake oil and it is really tough to get a straight answer out of them. You just have to step back think about why the former pro athlete who looks like runway model is making a millions dollars a month taking  instagram pics. Can a regular person who is putting out great content have the same amount of success?  The point that I want to make is that these so-called celebrity photo gurus and lifestyle entrepreneurs have never started from zero like you or I have.

I asked questions to a lot of these people in a hope that I would figure out how to get more sales for my tutorials. I got a lot of “make great content” and “work hard and hustle” but few actually gave me a concrete answer. The reason being that for the average photographer it is infinitely more difficult to get your name out there despite working hard and hustling everyday.

The point being is that if you are halfway normal, you really have to put in the effort to really get your name out there. The advice that you seek may not be the best fit because the one giving it may not have been in the same situation as you. So if you seek advice from the guru’s, here are some tips that might help you get a more useful answer.


Be Specific

Even if you think that you are, try to be even more specific. If you are asking about why no one is liking your image, they are going to give a basic, boring and generic answer. If you ask about what times you should post your image to get more likes and how to use analytics to get to know your audience, you will get closer to the answers that you want.

Choose Wisely

Not all knowledgeable internet gurus are cut from the same bolt of cloth. The guy with the great haircut that was a celebrity before he even picked up a camera can’t tell you how to start from zero. However, the if you are a landscape photographer seeking advice from a photographer shooting nudes, it is like comparing apples and oranges. Choose who and what you ask wisely. The reason being is that you want to get the no BS answer and if you ask the wrong person, BS is all that you are going to get.

Be a Part of Their Community

One the things that I notice a lot is that people can be very demanding when asking people to dispense their hard-earned knowledge. It is a bit like taking a great picture and having some stranger pop up and say “Where did you take this from? How do I get there?” For the most part I am want to help but in the same sense I am also thinking “Who the hell are you?” On the other hand if there is a member of my photo community and they pop up and like the photo and ask the same question, chances are I am going to help them out as best that I can.

These celebrity photographers are much the same. They probably get slammed by people demanding their time every day. So the best thing that you can do is be a part of their community and let them know a little bit about you. This give and take will have a great effect on their ability to know you and your work.

Onlookers

 

The post Getting Good Photography Advice is Hard. Accepting it is Even Harder! appeared first on The Sajin.


Solitary Sage: Korea’s “Go-un” Choi Chi-won Book By Professor David Mason

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Last year, the Asia Institute invited the public to attend a free lecture by the author of the first English language book written about Choi Chi-won, one of Korea’s greatest historical figures. Author David Mason grew up in Michigan & has now lived in South Korea for more than three decades. He received his M.A. in Korean Studies (focusing on the History of Korean Religions) at the Graduate School of International Studies of Yonsei University in Seoul. He’s worked as an editor for the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism, served as an enthusiastic tour-guide for groups of foreigners to Korea’s most beautiful and interesting areas, gives speeches on Korean history, culture & current development to various audiences, and also as a professor at the International Tourism for the Hanyang University Graduate School, a Professor of Cultural Tourism Studies at Kyung Hee University & currently at Chung-Ang University’s department of Public Service.  Korea FM reporter Chance Dorland attended the event & filed this report.

More information on Professor Mason’s book, “Solitary Sage: The Profound Life, Wisdom and Legacy of Korea’s “Go-un” Choi Chi-won”, can be found at http://san-shin.org/Goun-Solitary-Sage-Choi-Chiwon.html

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The post Solitary Sage: Korea’s “Go-un” Choi Chi-won Book By Professor David Mason appeared first on Korea FM.


Fulbright Korea’s Black Culture & History Festival

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In June of 2016, American English teachers & Fulbright English Teaching Assistants from around South Korea gathered at the Seoul Global Cultural Center in Myeong-dong to share their thoughts & cultural talents at the Black Culture & History FestivalKorea FM reporter Chance Dorland spoke with event organizers & attendees to get their thoughts on race relations in South Korea.

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Stream this episode online at http://www.spreaker.com/user/seoulitup/fulbright-korea-s-black-culture-history-

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This episode is brought to you by Podcast Assist & its $30 per hour flat rate podcasting voice overs, editing, mastering, transcriptions & even hosting (select a topic, they’ll create & host the podcast). Visit Facebook.com/PodcastAssist for more information. 

Interview answers, both in written & audio form, have been edited for length & clarity.

Rate & Review this podcast at bit.ly/KFMReview

Listen to Korea FM Talk Radio & News Podcasts online via:
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The post Fulbright Korea’s Black Culture & History Festival appeared first on Korea FM.


MMPK March 25th Dinner Meet-up Registration Open!

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Spring is here and we are ready to get out into the fresh air and enjoy some of that crisp air and fresh Makgeolli!

Screen Shot 2017-03-23 at 11.06.57

We have been visiting a lot of upscale and expensive restaurants of late, and we would like to get back to our roots and visit a more traditional makgeolli bar. We will be visiting the new trendy park in Hongdae/Sincheon area to have some old school Makgeolli and Pajeon next to the lovely green space.

Screen Shot 2017-03-23 at 11.42.30

This should be a fairly inexpensive meeting, with very traditional fare and a good variety of basic makgeollies.

 

If you want to get lively with us then send us an email to mmpkorea@gmail.com  ^^


Makgeolli Mamas & Papas
MMPKorea.wordpress.com


5 Secrets of the NIK Collection

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Years ago the NIK collection was one of the leading plugins for lightroom and it was competing with the likes of ON1 and other plugins. The NIK collection was and still is my go-to plugin for creative ideas and attempts to make a boring image better. The sad part is that since Google purchased the NIK collection, not a lot has been done with it. By not a lot, I mean outside of making it free, they have not updated a single thing.

However, this is not such a bad thing as the plugin is well made and while an update would be welcomed, not quite needed at this point. This should not put you off from downloading it and adding it to your lightroom arsenal. It can help in a pinch and could make the difference between a boring photo and one that really has some pop. Before we get into the secrets there are a few things that you should know about the collection.

What NIK is NOT

I recently saw a discussion about the NIK collection recently and I realized that there are a lot of misconceptions about the collection. Some people thought that it was similar to lightroom (it is not) and others thought that it was a glorified set of crappy filters (it is much more than that). What you should be thinking is that the NIK COLLECTION is a set of tools to help you enhance your photos. They came out before lightroom and even photoshop could produce decent HDR and they added a lot more versatility when it came to editing black and white images. However, it is not the be all and end all if you are thinking that you can save some money by just using the NIK collection.

What NIK is NOW

The NIK collection is made up of 7 different plugins that work from both Lightroom and Photoshop. Each of the 7 plugins have a drastically different use, but the main thing that you should take away from this is that they only enhance your photo. By that I mean that the heavy lifting of sharpening and other basic adjustments should be done to the image either before or after. As of March 25th 2016, google made the entire collection free. This is good news for many of you who are looking for a decent HDR or noise reduction plugin.

 

Secret #1 Fake Fall

One of the little known filters inside of color Efex Pro 4 is “Indian Summer” Great filter but misleading name. It sounds like a warming filter from Instagram but it most certainly is not. What Indian Summer does is change the colour of the leaves to fake autumn foliage. With a slight adjustment you can change the season instantly. While it may not be 100% perfect it’s main goal is to help in those times where you need the leaves to pop. However, if you have the time you can turn green leave read or yellow. Do make use of the control points (see the image above) as it will turn pine tree the same colour as the rest of the trees and that that will give away the effect. Use the control point to remove the effect on the unwanted areas.

 

 

Secret #2 Tilt Shift Miniature Effect

Analog Efex 2 is something of an enigma. What I believe was an attempt at making a instagram-like retro camera emulator turned out to be something more robust when they updated it. Once you have opened the plugin, click on the camera that you are using and it will bring up a menu with all of the effects in it. Click on Bokeh and then look on the left and you will see a circle and a square with dotted lines. Click that one and it will apply the tilt-shift effect. You can tweak it a bit but just don’t go too crazy. You want to make it as believable as possible.

Secret #3 Realistic HDR

HDR has a bad reputation for making your eyes bleed unicorn poo and rightfully so. Many of my images do make people want to vomit rainbows. However, NIKs HDR Efex Pro  actually is capable of making genuine realistic HDR images without the crazy halos and weird dark spots that other HDR editors make. It takes a little fine tuning but the key is in your tone mapping. If you stay towards the realistic setting when it comes to the HDR effect, try to keep the depth around normal. Also note that the structure slider works a lot better than lightroom’s clarity slider.

Secret #4 The Detail Extractor

Again jumping to Color Efex Pro 4, the detail extract does what it say and a bit more. It enhances the detail but also allows you to adjust the color saturation and contrast to give an almost HDR-like effect using a single image. Again this may not be to everyone’s liking but it does appeal to people like myself who are always looking for a bit of pop from their images.

Secret #5 The Structure Slider

As I mentioned before that the structure slider works a lot like the clarity slider inside of Lightroom. However, I find that it works a lot better than Lightroom’s because it actually does what it’s supposed to do and that is add more structure and detail to the image. If you crank up the clarity slider too much it makes your image look post-apocalyptic thanks to the messed up contrast and desaturation. However, the structure slider actually enhances the image. You can find this slider in most of the plugins found in the collection. It really helps bring out the detail in the image.


Well, there you have it. There are many more secrets to learn in this free collection. Now if you are wanting to learn the basics of lightroom check out my tutorial by clicking the button below.

Jason Teale’s Lightroom Tutorials

 

The post 5 Secrets of the NIK Collection appeared first on The Sajin.


SeoulFood: CraftBros Tap House & Bottle Shop (Apgujeong Bar)

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CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto SeoulcialiteFinding a spot in Gangnam where you can relax and catch up with a friend can often be overwhelming.  South of the Han there are SO many cafes, restaurants, bars, clubs, lounges, and hofs that making a decision can be infuriating.  If you’re looking for an after-work hangout, CraftBros Bottle & Tap House is a great Apgujeong bar with plenty of options for beer!

CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite

The Spot:

With this unassuming facade, one might walk right past this 2-storey chicken and beer place.  Nestled among clothing retailers, high-end designers, cafes, and Korean BBQ places it would be easily overlooked.  The name isn’t evident (it just says Bottle & Tap House), so trying to grab a map for the post wasn’t the easiest.  I’m not even 100% certain this is a CraftBros location (their Facebook page says they’re in Banpo).  I’ve included a map to the location on the card which was given to me last week when we visited.

CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite

The rows on rows of beer bottles are impressive (and slightly overwhelming)!  The craft beer bottle shop stocks a variety from across Asia as well as the United States, Russia, and Belgium (Dubbels and Tripels are my favourites).  We decided to go local and try the Gangnam Pale Ale.

CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite
CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite

The Beer:

The taps are pretty cute at this crisp and clean Apgujeong bar!  The Gangnam Pale Ale was perfectly hoppy, but wasn’t heavy.  I typically venture for less hoppy beers because my stomach feels unsettled after a robust brew.  This one hit the spot and didn’t linger.  I had my standard Dubbel for my second drink and was exactly as expected: rich, smooth, and sweet.

CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite

The Food:

We decided to share the double portion of fried chicken.  Excuse the image above.  I was pretty ravenous after the gym and dipped in before snapping!  I liked that there wasn’t any breading on the fried chicken.  It came with honey mustard sauce, coleslaw, and raddish.  This was a pretty standard chimaek spread, but the chicken was tasty and the beers were great.  The double portion of chicken was KRW 12,000 and our beers must have been pretty cheap because even going splitsy we only ended up paying about KRW 10,000 each.  Pretty cheap for an Apgujeong bar!

CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite

CraftBros Bottle Shop Tap House Apgujeong Bar Gangnam Chicken and Beer The Toronto Seoulcialite

The Verdict:

While the staff didn’t speak too much English, they tried their best to make us feel welcome and at home.  They even gave us each a set of calendars after dinner!  They are designed by either the owner or one of the staff members (I’m pretty sure).  Although we weren’t stuffed we were pleasantly satiated.  For a cheap and cheerful Apgujeong bar and a great after work environment I’d definitely head back.  The verdict?  Go for the beers and the vibe, stay for the chicken.

Location:

656-11 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul

The post SeoulFood: CraftBros Tap House & Bottle Shop (Apgujeong Bar) appeared first on The Toronto Seoulcialite.


The Toronto Socialite
 
      
That Girl Cartier
 
     

 


How to Say ‘Eat’ in Korean

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One of the great things about living in Korea is that you can try all of the various foods that Korea has to offer. From spicy ttokpoki, to ice-cold naengmyeon, there is something that will suit everybody’s taste. One of the most useful words to know in Korean is how to say ‘eat’ in Korean.

This article will teach you how to say ‘eat’ in Korean, so that you can start enjoying all of the country’s awesome food.

Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes.

'eat' in Korean

‘Eat’ in Korean

To Eat

Like many of the most common Korean verbs, there are actually two different verbs that mean ‘to eat’ in Korean. One of these is used in normal situations, and the other is used when referring to your elders or seniors. It is important to use these words correctly if you want to be polite in Korea.

먹다 (meokda)

This is the standard verb for ‘to eat’ in Korean. It is used when referring to yourself (I want to eat, I ate, etc.) or when referring to people of the same age or younger than you.

들다 / 드시다 (deulda / deushida)

This is the ‘honorific’ form of the verb ‘to eat’ in Korean. The actual dictionary word is 들다, but it as it is always used with 시, you will often see it as 드시다. It is also easier to remember드시다 if you want to use it correctly, especially as 들다 has 103 other meanings in Korean.

You should use this word when referring to somebody older than you. It is also commonly used when asking questions (Do you want to eat?) or giving commands (Eat this) to people who you don’t know well.

There is actually a third verb for ‘to eat’, which is 잡수시다 (japsushida), but this is used less frequently than 드시다.

eat formal

  1. Formal

먹습니다 (Meokseumnida)

드십니다 (Deushimnida)

You can use formal language when giving a presentation, making an announcement, or in a job interview. The verb that you should use depends on whether you are talking about yourself, or talking about somebody older than you.

Example:

다랑어는 보통 날것으로 먹습니다.

(Darangeoneun botong nalgeoseuro meokseumnida)

Tuna is usually eaten raw.

우리는 설날에 떡국을 끓여 먹습니다.

(urineun seolnale ddeokgukeul ggeulyeo meokseumnida)

We feast on rice cake soup on the Lunar New Year.

 

  1. Standard

먹어요 (Meokeoyo)

드세요 (Deuseyo)

The standard form of Korean is used when talking to people of a similar age who you are not really close with. If you want to ask a question or ask somebody to do something (or if you are referring to somebody a lot older than you), then you should use the 드세요 form of the verb ‘to eat’, in other situations, use the 먹어요 form of ‘to eat’.

Example:

맛있게 드세요

(mashittge deuseyo)

Bon appetite

 

매운 것은 잘 못 멋어요

(maeun geoseun jal mot meokeoyo)

I can’t eat spicy food well.

eat informal

  1. Informal

먹어

Informal words are used when speaking with people you are very close with, or people who are younger than you. Honorific words such as 들다 (to eat) are not used when speaking informally.

Example:

이 음식이 맛이 있는지 한 번 먹어 봐.

(i eumshiki masi ittneunji han beon meokeo bwa)

Try this food and see if you like it.

 

 

A word of caution about Romanization

Although all of these examples have Romanization, it is far better to learn the Korean alphabet, known as Hangeul, if you are serious about learning Korean. Hangeul is far simpler than it first appears, and can be learned in less than two hours.

 

Now that you know how to say ‘eat’ in Korean, go out and enjoy some great Korean food.

Want more Korean phrases? Go to our Korean Phrases Page for a complete list!


Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

 


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Wish List: Mugs

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It’s not quite spring yet, but you can almost taste it, can’t you? Which means we’re almost into the half of the year when I have to specify — and repeat — and double check one more time that anything I order at a cafe will be delivered hot instead of iced.

While I may do the occasional cold brew at home, I generally take my coffee (and tea) hot all year long, and if there is anything I don’t need more of, it’s mugs. The last time I allowed myself to buy another one to add to the already teeming shelf, it cost me 50,000 won (about $50 US). For a mug. I was that in love with it. The problem is, now I’m afraid to use it. It never goes in the sink with the other dishes, and I only use it when Charlie, little coffee spilling terrorist that he is, is safely down for a nap. No, I’m not kidding.

So instead of buying these, I’m gazing at them longingly and posting them here for your consideration. If you happen to snap one up, leave a comment and let me know how it is in real life.

  1. Milk & Juice Glass from Mokryun; 16,000 KRW
  2. Mug from Hwasoban; 38,000 KRW
  3. Hyun Sang-hwa’s Short Mug from Dining Objet; 38,000 KRW
  4. Yumiko Iihoshi’s ReIRABO Cup M from TWL; 43,000 KRW
  5. Cylinder Wood Mug from Mokryun; 30,000 KRW
  6. Jo Seong-an’s Mug Cup from Soseng; 20,000 KRW
  7. Right Angle Groove Cup from Mokryun; 12,000 KRW

The post Wish List: Mugs appeared first on Follow the River North.


Follow the River North
Followtherivernorth.com

Freelance writer and editor. American in Seoul. I write about Korean food. I blog about all food. Last year I wrote a monthly column about traveling to different places around the country to explore Korean ingredients and cuisine. This ignited my interest in local foods and cooking, which I blog about regularly now. I also blog restaurant and cafe recommendations, recipes and some background and history about Korean food.

Categories
Books & Stuff    Cafés & Shops     Korean Food & Ingredients      Personal     Recipes       Restaurants & Bars


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