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How to Say ‘How Old Are You?’ in Korean

In some cultures, asking somebody their age when you first meet them might seem a little bit strange. However, in Korea, this is one of the most important questions that you can ask. Learning how to say ‘How old are you?’ in Korean is extremely important, so make sure that you learn this vital phrase!

The reason that it is so important is that Koreans use different language when talking about people of a different age. Read this article to see how the way you refer to friends changes based on age. For example if you are female, and your friend is a (slightly) older male, you will refer to him as 오빠 (oppa).

Age also determines what level of politeness you should use when speaking, and it can also affect things like who pours the drinks, cuts the meat at a barbeque restaurant, or pays the bill in certain situations.


House of Rose

blurred-palms-at-sunset-vince-cavataio

The girl carefully slid the key out from its slot behind the dark wooden check-in desk. She waved a few loose strands of hair from her face and motioned for me to follow. I trudged behind, lugging my backpack and sweating. It was only nine in the morning and already hot. My mind was full of static and eyes bleary from lack of sleep.


Sincheon Sweetness: A Day Off

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Children’s Day and Cinco de Drinko fall on the same day in Korea.  Coincidence?  Perhaps, but I’d rather just use this time of year as an excuse to have a marvelous margarita.  The majority of my friends actually got a 4-day weekend this year!  Alas, I am still working Friday, but got a bit of a mid-week repose having Thursday off.  I wanted to spend the day recuperating from the activities of the week (it’s exhausting running around teaching this many classes to this many teeny tiny ones!), but the sun was out in full force and I had to make the most of the day.


Jindo: Puppies, Pink Cherry Blossoms, and the Parting of the Sea

cropped-20160409_063036.jpgWe had seen the sea parting once, not knowing it would part two more times again by sundown.  Some of us (self included) were a little worried about getting seasick on the boat out to Modo Island, so instead of braving the sea we actually ended up having a leisurely morning getting ready (after a well-deserved, post-parting nap!) before heading down the cherry-blossom lined paths and street over to the festival.


The Best Places to Visit in Korea

There are so many great places to visit in Korea, from peaceful temples, to needle-edged mountains. If you want to get out of Seoul for the weekend, then you can’t go wrong if you visit one of the places in this article. Keep reading to learn about some of the best places to visit in Korea!

 

Gwangalli Beach (광안리 해수욕장) and Gwangan Bridge (광안대교), Busan

Gwangali Beach Busan


Juban: Revamped Traditional Korean Alcohol in Seochon


Itaewon: For Cocktail Lovers?

This past summer I visited Seoul for a whirlwind, one night only stay after an interview for an MBA program.  I wasn’t there for the shopping or the nightlife, but a couple of friends from Busan were up for the weekend so I decided to stick around.  We checked out Prost, which I have since revisited and which has been jam-packed and unbearable each time.  Up until this weekend I hadn’t really had a wild and wonderful night on the town.  Enter Ramie’s and Fountain.

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International Wines and Spirits Expo 2016

When it rains it pours!


Children’s Day in Korea

Everybody in Korea gets excited when they look at the calendar and notice that one of the days is written in red. These special ‘red days’ are national holidays, which means that salaried workers get a day off work and children get a day off school. One of the ‘red days’ in May is Children’s Day.


Top 5 Korean Language Exchange Sites (and why you should be using them!)

Committing to learning a new language is one of the best ways to broaden the horizons that make up your own day to day life. In becoming familiar with a new language, you’re also laying the groundwork for being able to watch movies, listen to music, and read books that were previously inaccessible.

If you’re anything like me, though, you’re not a big fan of the way learning a language used to be done – long hours in front of a textbook, boring writing exercises, and little to no real world application of the language.

Korean language exchanges are an amazing tool for anyone interested in learning to Korean language – they allow you to practice what you’ve learned in a friendly, casual, and educational environment that adds a fun new element to the learning process.


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