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How to Say ‘Gift’ in Korean

If you’ve been wondering how to say ‘gift’ in Korean, you’ve come to the right place!

This word can be used on so many occasions – birthdays, Christmas, Korean New Year and of course, all of the Korean love holidays!

We’ve got a “gift” in store for you today. That’s right, we’re going to teach you how to say ‘gift’ in Korean and we’ll even show you how you can use it in some common scenarios.

You’ve been waiting long enough so without further ado, here it is!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

‘Gift’ in Korean

The way to say ‘gift’ in Korean is 선물 (seon-mul). Of course, the word ‘present’ also translates to the same word in Korean. Commit it to memory and add it to your arsenal of Korean vocabulary words!

Ipari (이파리)

Name: Ipari (이파리)

Location: Hongdae/Yeonhuidong

Trazy’s 8 Step Guide to Korean Restaurant Culture

Even the most experienced foodies can feel lost at authentic Korean restaurants.  Follow these 8 steps to enjoy the flavours of Korea like a local.


The most delicious Korean restaurants are often hidden in basements or behind small alley ways. Locals use Naver Cafe, a Korean-language-only free blogging service used in a similar manner as Yelp, to research restaurants and order the most delicious recommended foods on their menus. Don’t know Korean? Trazy’s got you covered, check out our restaurants section.

How to Say ‘Excuse Me’ in Korean

Saying ‘excuse me’ in Korean is more of an adventure than you might expect!

The phrase used depends on the situation, the speaker, and the listener. Once you consider these three factors, you will know how to say ‘excuse me’ in Korean naturally. Therefore, it is important that you listen and observe Korean life to get a feeling of how different words are used.

Here are the ways to say ‘excuse me’ in Korean.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


2015 Jarasum Makgeolli Festival – Wrap up

How to Say ‘I’m Sorry’ in Korean

When living in a foreign country, you are bound to make cultural faux pas, mistakes, and other general errors.


Therefore, learning how to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Korean will be very useful to know if you plan on spending any amount of time in Korea.

Not only will it help you smooth out mistakes and misunderstandings, but it will also show what great manners Mom taught you.

Here we go!

*NOTE: Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

I saved my soul by coming to Korea

Dramatic as it may sound, it is true. I used to regard my tenure here as a “time-out” of sorts. A “time-out” out of the grind of life in the United States that seems to befall all who are partaking in the race, rich and poor alike. “I’ll get to live in a Buddhist nation, (albeit heavily capitalistic as well – as I write this two Buddhist monks just walked into the Starbucks I’m at, judge away but I swear by Buddha its true)” I fantasized. Experience the collectivism of East Asian culture, which has been such a delight (I know this is a generalization, and I don’t give a damn…it’s a good one). “I’ll get to travel deep into Asia, India, Nepal, Thailand, THAILAND anywhere.”

Stuff I Did in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Here’s what I did during my short stint in KL. (Other than take the LSAT, haha.)


  1. KUALA LUMPUR BIRD PARK, KL Bird Park, 920, Jalan Cenderawasih, 50480 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    1. Entrance fee was about 50 ringgits, or $13 USD. The park was really big, and going there was way more fun than I had expected. There’s something majestic about being surrounded by giant, weird birds.  Highlight of the trip was the emus, by far. Oh, and the monkeys were cute.


How to Say ‘Goodbye’ in Korean

If you’ve already figured out to how to say ‘hello’ in Korean, then you’re read to add the next important phrase to the mix.

Today, we’ll show you how to say ‘goodbye’ in Korean.

There is more than one way of saying ‘goodbye’. You should use a different ‘goodbye’ phrase depending on whether you are the person going or the person staying.

Let’s get to it!

*NOTE: Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

Standard ‘Goodbye’ in Korean

1. 안녕히 가세요 (annyeonghi kaseyo)

If the other person is leaving, then you should say 안녕히 가세요 ‘annyeonghi kaseyo’. Let’s break it down!

How to Say ‘Hello’ in Korean

‘Hello’ is often the first word that people learn when studying a new language. Learning this simple phrase helps you make friends, greet acquaintances, and seem like an overall friendly person!

The Korean word for ‘hello’ changes based on who you are speaking to, so it’s important to get it right. It can be simple as long as you know a few tricks for how to learn it.

Get ready, this lesson is going to take you through some of the different ways to say ‘hello’ in Korean!


How to Say ‘Thank You’ in Korean

Being able to say ‘thank you’ is one of the most important things to learn when starting a new language. When people first start to learn Korean, they are often surprised that there are more ways to say ‘thank you’ than there are in English.

Today, we will learn how to say ‘thank you’ in Korean.

Once you understand the subtleties in the various situations, listen for ‘thank you’s in your daily conversations. It’ll all start to come together.
Let’s get to it!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!


The Best Fall Korean Festivals in 2015

As the seasons begin to change and the temperature begins to drop, we say goodbye to summer and start to look ahead towards what’s on the schedule for autumn.

Korea is home to plenty of fun Fall festivals to take advantage of – whether you’re looking for delicious food, seasonal drinks, or festive music, read on below for festivals to look forward to. Break out your sweaters and start making a plan for which festivals you’re going to hit and when, because the season will be over before you know it.

There’s something for everybody, so don’t be surprised if you’re tempted to hit them all!

Bai Xep

Yesterday I rented a motorbike again. Driving here is scary. But outside the city it’s soooo fun because there aren’t many people on the road. I drove around aimlessly away from town and saw so many breathtaking things. I stumbled upon a beautiful fishing village with an island.  The water was so clear blue it hurt. I walked around on the beach for a while, to many HELLOs from the local children. It looked like the locals were thoroughly engaged in snorkeling and sea urchin hunting. Everyone was friendly, except the young boy who angrily threw sand in my face. Haha.

Then, I went to this place called Haven.  The road there was kind of horrifying because it wound up and down steep hills and trucks and huge buses passed me a bit too close for comfort.

A Walk Across Busan

I’m Giving Away 3 Hits of Awesome: The Monster Pack Giveaway

The Monster Pack-Resources for busy English teachers

Good news for you, readers of ESL Speaking. You’ve just seen this in the nick of time. In less than a week, I’ll be giving away 3 hits of awesome. By “hits of awesome,” I mean The Monster Pack: Resources for Busy English Teachers, of course.

Now, I’m all about teaching what I want to teach because I’m super-weary of the same old overdone topics in the ESL textbooks and prefer talking about stuff that is personally interesting to me and hopefully more relevant for the students. But, that’s a topic for another day.

The Best Korean Movies for Learning Korean

Grab your popcorn and your favorite drink—it’s time to study some Korean!

Korean study doesn’t have to be serious and formal. It’s quite helpful to mix it up by studying some Korean movies. Not only will you get some excellent listening practice, but the movies will make you more excited about learning the language.

The best Korean movies are not always the best movies for studying Korean. Therefore, you may need to compromise your artistic integrity a bit and watch more low-brow Korean movies if you are watching without subtitles.

It is also a good idea to avoid older movies as the language used in them is very different to modern Korean. As movies are often fast paced, be prepared to watch a movie (or parts of a movie) multiple times in order to follow it.

And now without further ado, here are some of the best Korean movies for studying the language!

The Manjok (The 만족)


What are you doing here?

“What are you doing here?”

It’s a question a lot of Vietnamese people probably want to ask me (or actually are asking me and I just can’t understand it) as they see me, a twenty-two year old white American female, browsing casually through the grocery store or studying for my LSAT in a cafe.  Listening to music, sweating profusely in the heat. And alone. Always, always alone.

Tonight, my new coworker “Pierre,” a French guy masquerading as an American so he can teach English as a native speaker, invited “Curly,” my other coworker, to come with him to check out some local real estate and then grab dinner. I overheard this conversation and decided to invite myself. Figured it’d be nice to get to know my coworkers, and they are certainly a strange pair.

The Best Korean Street Food in Korea

Korea is well-known for too many things to count – music, television, and a rich, interesting history are only a few of the things that make Korean culture so unlike any other.

Another aspect of Korean culture that is unique and hard to beat is the incredible street food sprinkled throughout the country’s cities.

Whether you’re looking for a quick, salty snack or an adventure for your taste buds, read on to find out about some of the best Korean street food!

Sundae – 순대

It’s not “goodbye.” It’s “안녕히 계세요.”

2-3 students

Goodbyes are always tough. But yesterday, during my last day as an English teacher at Ulsan Sports Science School, I experienced a whole new level of emotional farewells. Over the past year, I was fortunate enough to be surrounded by wonderful coworkers and enthusiastic students, all of whom consistently went above and beyond with their generosity, kindness and sincerity to make me feel welcomed and cared for.

The Ins and Outs of Quinhon Cuisine

After much debate, I decided that I definitely want to stay in Quinhon until my contract ends. If I quit, I’d still have challenges facing me back at home. I’d have to find housing, a job, and a way to study for the LSAT in the midst of all the changes.  And I’d have lost the opportunity to gain valuable work experience.  So I’m staying (unless I get randomly fired again, which I hope doesn’t happen!).

My modus operandi isn’t to chase a carefree, happy life. I believe in learning to see positives, even in difficult times.  Life is stressful, no matter if you’re living in Quinhon or Anapolis. Fulfilling my contract here will be great practice in stress management, and will also give me an invaluable opportunity to learn about a culture different from my own.

How to Meet Korean Friends Outside Korea

If you have never been to Korea or are planning to go, you might be wondering how you can meet Korean friends. If you live outside Korea, it may not seem that easy. You cannot simply step outside your door and find Koreans just anywhere, unless you live in certain neighborhoods in Los Angeles or New York. If flying all the way to the other side of the world isn’t an option for you, then you can take these steps so you can be on your way to having many, many Korean 친구 (friends)!

The Lonely Foreigner

I do not like living in Qui Nhon.

The English is at a really low level. Vietnamese is a tonal language, so even when I do memorize a few words and phrases, no one understands what I’m trying to say because I can’t get the tones right. Ordering food is virtually impossible. Literally everything I’ve eaten so far has made me sick. I may never not have diarrhea again.  Locals overcharge me. I work splits six days a week. The school is infested with rats. I experience strange spells of lightheadedness. I am living out of a suitcase. The beach is right next to my hotel room, but the weather is so scorching and humid that I can’t enjoy it. Indoors, airconditioning is sparse. People stare at me wherever I go. Teenagers come up to me for pictures. Parents push their children towards me and I am compelled to have uncomfortable, phony conversations with them, consisting mainly of “How are you today?” “I’m five.”

Sneaky Selfies, Karma, and Loneliness

Right now I’m sitting in a place called Cafe Sunrise. As I type this, there is an elderly gentleman with a gold watch on sits in front of me. He’s in sunglasses smoking a cigarette. I caught him taking selfies, and thought oh how cute.  Then I looked closer, and noticed that his selfies were carefully composed to feature me typing on my computer in the background of every shot. 


why obsessed


I eventually decided to just go up to him and strike a pose.


I have allergies. Symptoms include: horrendously itchy nose, runny-stuffy nose, watery puppydog eyes, wet cough, headache, misery. Does anyong have any advice about allergies? No idea how to find out what’s causing them exactly, or how to stop this torture.


My 1st Day Teaching in Vietnam

It’s so hot here. So hot. So jungly. Me and my heat rashes are definitely going through an adjustment period!


My morning walk...gorgeous but fucking hot as fuck
My morning walk…gorgeous but fucking hot as fuck


My first day of teaching was yesterday…..


‘Seoul Searching’ Director: ‘This Country is Half Made Up of Minorities, But Cinema Doesn’t Reflect That’


A movie any gyopo can relate to.

Originally posted on Variety:

Warning: Do Not Learn Korean This Way

When learning a language, it is very easy to struggle or become demotivated because of the way that you are studying.

Think back to when you learned a language in high school. Many people can’t remember much of the languages they learned at school despite spending many hours studying them. And as a result, they believe that they are naturally bad at languages.

The good news is that usually that’s not true, and now you have a second chance. If you make use of better techniques you will find that language learning can be surpingly fun, simple, and effective!


Living in Korea: 10 Korean Apps You Need

When you are in Korea, you can download various Korean apps onto your smartphone in order to make your life simpler and easier. Here are ten of the most useful applications for life in Korea.


If you don’t have KakaoTalk on your phone then you might as well not even have a phone. This Korean app is so widespread that even your sixty-year-old boss will send you messages over KakaoTalk rather than regular texts.

2. Aco-Coffee, Gimhae, Gyongsangnamdo

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