tips on living in korea

Budget Travel Tip: Gangwon Shuttle Service

Traveling in Korea doesn't have to break the bank. It's also easier than one might imagine, even for foreigners. Especially for foreigners.

In an effort to increase tourism in their regions, many provincial governments have begun to offer special services to international guests. Lucky us! One such example is the Gangwon Shuttle Service sponsored by Gangwon Province. This shuttle bus is a great way for foreigners to experience Korea's most breathtaking natural landmarks as well as some of its best festivals.



Hus-hu: Seoul's Best English Speaking Dental Clinic

Going to the dentist can be scary anywhere, but even more so in a place where language barriers exist and clinical procedures aren't necessarily the same as those in one's home country.

Still, one's health should not be neglected simply because one is intimidated by language or unknown procedural costs.  Despite my nursing background, it actually took me a couple years to work up the courage to go to the dentist in Korea.  As a result, I ended up with a few cavities and an urgent need to get myself to the nearest clinic ASAP.  I did a few searches on Google and came across multiple testimonials that led me to Hus-hu Dental Clinic, a highly reputed dental office that caters to both locals and foreigners from all around the world.

Learning Korean: Which Program is Right for You?

Considering that fact that Korean is often regarded as one of the most difficult languages for native English speakers to learn, those that move to Korea might be intimidated to begin the arduous and often frustrating journey of learning the local language.  But, there can be many benefits to learning Korean.  Getting a grasp on the basics makes expat life far more comfortable and allows one to better understand the culture and feel more integrated with society.  Then there are the added bonuses of more job opportunities and bragging rights.  Because, let's face it... how many non-Koreans can actually say that they speak Korean?

Committing oneself to studying is the first and often most difficult step to learning Korean.  So what about after that?

For those of us who grew up in a country where there is little to no priority on learning a second language, it's difficult to know which study methods and programs work best to memorize vocabulary words, comprehend unfamiliar sentence structures, and perfect one's pronunciation.  And because everyone learns differently, it might take a bit of trial and error to figure out which approach is best for you.

Although I am still very much a beginner, I have attempted a number of techniques and attended a variety of classes to find what works for me.  Below are my personal experiences, including the pros and cons of each.


How to Stretch Your Won and Save Money While Living in Seoul

 

Recently, I quit my job as an English teacher and decided to study Korean full-time as a university student.  I had forgotten what it was like to live without a steady income and it didn't take me long to realize that my habits of frivolous spending had to come to an end. For good.

You see, when you live in Seoul, especially if you're teaching English, it's easy to throw around money and not even realize you're spending it.  Between nights out bar hopping in Hongdae, dinners at upscale restaurants in Itaewon, daily morning coffee at Starbucks, and shopping dates on Garuso-gil, it's not difficult to blow half of one's salary in just a few weeks.  Of course, since most English teachers do not pay rent or car insurance or any other "grown up" bills that they would otherwise pay in their home countries, saving money isn't much of a challenge, either.


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