Seoraksan

Neither Rain Nor Rain


Don't let the snazzy background fool you. I was annoyed.


Panoramic Korea

Below is a collection of panoramic shots taken throughout my year in Korea! Enjoy!


Gimme Shelter

Gimme Shelter

This image was made on my final day of my On-The-Road series, a 17-day, multi-city tour of peninsular South Korea. For the last day, I was caught in torrential downpours in the Seoraksan National Park as the heavens opened. I managed to seek refuge in Sinheung-sa grotto, carved into the rocks of Ulsanbawi. The monks here served me green tea and allowed me to rest in the grotto while the rain died down. I'm going to use this as my once chance to name an image after The Rolling Stones song, 'Gimme Shelter.'

Final Fall Encounters at Seoraksan National Park

I've said it before and I'll say it again.  Korea in fall is a sight to be seen.  There are plenty of places to experience all the wonderful things about the season, but there is one special destination that allows visitors to experience autumn in all its glory: Seoraksan National Park.

Outdoor Tourism in Korea : Featuring Photography of Seoraksan (Seorak Mountain)

Seoraksan Post-7

Tourism in Korea will explode because of one untapped resource – nature.

When foreigners (non-Americans) think of New York, they think of uncompromising skyscrapers, broad avenues, plush shopping and a city that never sleeps.  They, like most Americans, forget that New York is a massive state that offers much more than a singular city.  New York is a state of nature, mountains, and a beautiful drive on the Mohawk Towpath.


How NOT to climb Mount Seoraksan

Mount Seoraksan

There was the choking back of tears, lots of grumblings mixed with fits of delirious happiness and elation on the way up, but I can now say that I actually climbed right to the top of  Daechongbong  peak of Seoraksan mountain! Hurray!

Mount Seoraksan is in Seoraksan national park in the North of ROK. I'd heard that it was really beautiful in the Autumn when all the trees that cling onto the mountain sides begin to turn to red and orange, so I was really excited about the mini adventure that we planned. Although I had a really great weekend, there are a few things that I'd tell others to do a little differently...

FALLing in Love with Korea in Autumn

I can feel it.

There's a crispness in the air that whispers fall is close.  So close, in fact, that the first hints of autumn colors can be seen streaking the mostly verdant leaves that canopy the green spaces of Seoul. The aroma of roasting chestnuts permeates the busy streets downtown.  Sweaters take over the storefronts of Myeongdong, Dongdaemun, and Sinsa, the shopping havens of the city.

Yes, I can feel it.  And I'm giddy.

You see, there's something about autumn that makes my heart beat a little faster.  There always has been.  When I lived in America, it was tailgating and trick-or-treating that did it for me.  But here, in Korea, there are a number of things that instill a sense of infatuation deep within me that keep me waiting for this beautiful season every year.

Two Biggies in Two Weeks: Seoraksan and Jirisan

My hiking group does these trips identified as overnighters. Don't get the term confused with a weekend trip, say, departing on a nice Saturday afternoon, staying in a hostel/motel/hotel, a brisk hike the next day and then going home in the early evening. No, they are definitely not that. Instead, they entail meeting at a rented bus at 11:30pm on a Friday night (after a full days work), traveling 3-4 hours in the night/"sleeping," and starting a climb up a mountain at 3-4 am in the dark. The hikes will last 12-16 hours and we'll head back for home late in the night.


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