parents

Dear Dad

Dad and NathanDear Dad,

In ten hours I’ll be on a plane to Korea. At the moment, the only thing that amazes me more than that fact is your boundless love and support. Where ever my passions have called me, you have been a constant force of guidance and encouragement. No words are good enough to adequately express how much that means to me, and how lucky and proud I feel to be your son.


Conferencing with Parents

Yesterday was the dreaded "Parent Teacher Conferences", and I am glad to report that I am still alive and well. 

I had found out about these conferences at the end of last month while looking at one of my student's newsletters.  Now my Korean is far from good, but I like to look at the news letters to get an idea of when this month's field trip is and when the monthly birthday party will grace me with more cake.  This time I saw mention of all the kindergarten classes and different dates-  I asked one of the Koreans about it and was told we were doing parent teacher conferences. 

Now I've taught open classes where the administration can come in and watch me teach, but this was my first parent teacher conference as a non-student. 

THE SAD SEASON

January, for most folks  in the northern part of the globe, at least, is a depressing slog, a dreary return to normalcy after the forced cheer of the holidays.  The number on the year clock clicks ahead and we’re thrust into full winter, slightly refreshed from our new year’s vows, though made to reckon with the realities of life.  Many folks hate this collection of days, but the fact that my birthday lies in the dead center of the month has always brightened it up for me, though, now that I’m getting older, the time will come when a birthday is no longer a source of happiness, but rather a cause for alarm.  But January no longer means what is used to for me.  That was changed in 2008 and then 2009, when both my parents left us, less than a year apart.  This bleak month lived up to its reputation.


Question from a reader: what to tell your parents

A reader writes in:

My parents seemed quite impressed and supportive when I mentioned that teaching in Korea was a possibility for graduates like myself, but now that I’ve actually started the process, they’re, well… less than, shall we say.

Any advice/tips/resources you could recommend to help put them at ease? I’m going to go through with it either way, but it is nice to have them on one’s side..

[D.S.]

D.S.,

“You’re doing WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? WHY?!” The questions are as varied as the people, and the responses aren’t necessarily straightforward.

For twenty-plus years, they’ve been trying to keep you safe, out of trouble, and possibly bailing you out of a tough situation. To most parents, choosing to leave your home country will come as a shock, or at the very least a change of plans. In most cases, however, being a twentysomething means the need to recognize your independence.

Some questions parents commonly ask:


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