Mexico

Mexican Food in Seoul

Hey everyone! 
 
It's time to talk about one of my favorite things ever.... Mexican Food!, funny how I used to write about Korean Food in Mexico and now I'm doing the opposite. 
 
3 months ago I left Mexico, I've never been away from my home-country for so long, surprisingly, what I miss the most is the Food, you can say I'm food-homesick?, almost 2 years ago I posted "My 12 reasons to visit Korea" and 1 of them was eating Mexican food in Korea, so, of course when we decided to spend some..."more" time in Korea I knew we would be definitely doing it. 

Guest Post: Super Junior en Latinoamerica


Mucho se ha especulado en México acerca de la Visita de Super Junior, se habla de conciertos en Latinoamerica e inmediatamente las Fans en México se preguntan por que no vienen a nuestro país, le pedí a una amiga que me ayudara con este tema pues yo no soy experta en Kpop y mucho menos cuestiones de Super Junior, asi que Carmen me ayudo a escribir el siguente post de Super Junior en Latinoamerica.



Talk to me in Korean Around the World - Mexico

Reseña del Concierto de Xia Junsu en Mexico


Hola!! 

Aprovechando que acabo de regresar y apenas estoy poniendo todas las fotos del Viaje a Corea en orden, les quiero dejar una reseña del concierto de Junsu en Mexico, esta reseña me la mando Carmen Sotelo, una ex-compañera de mi clase de Coreano que tuvo la oportunidad de asistir al 1er concierto de Kpop en México!

Ancient Cities: Uxmal

In folklore El Adivino (the Magician’s Pyramid) in Uxmal was built in one night by a
dwarf who hatched from an iguana’s egg. The story goes that the King learnt from a
premonition that his kingdom would fall to a little person.
Not wishing to relinquish his throne he sentenced the dwarf to death. The dwarf’s mother
hearing this, pleaded with the king until he showed leniency and gave the dwarf three
near impossible tasks to spare his life.

One of the three was to build the pyramid in a single night.


Ancient Cities: Chichen Itza

Of the three Mayan cities we were to visit over the next two weeks, Chichen Itza was the most desirable. For us the iconic temple was a figurehead for Mayan civilisation. Based in Mexico’s Yucatan province, the UNESCO World Heritage site is one of the more popular ancient ruins, with over a million people visiting the thousand-year old city every year.

However, despite our high-expectations, standing in-front of El Castillo at Chichen Itza had us surprisingly unfulfilled. A few feet away was part of an ancient major city, a famous landmark of the Mayan empire and an overrated tourist attraction.


Valladolid, Mexico – Hostel la Candelaria

We left Cancun’s mosquito population behind us and headed west to Valladolid. A small city in the Yucatan province, housing around 46,000 inhabitants.

We stayed in cosy accommodation, Hostel La Candelaria, which hid a miniature Eden behind an huge iron gate.


Cancun: the bloodsucker’s banquet

One night I’d like to erase from memory is our infernal first night in Cancun City, Mexico. The night was like Lucifer’s sauna. The lack of air conditioning in our proximity meant every movement produced an obscene amount of perspiration. It seemed our room habitually trapped the sun’s heat and the ceiling fan had about as much gusto as a stone wall. Our only option was to open the windows in an attempt to rejuvenate the stale air.

We stripped and laid down. With the nightcap numbing our bodies and adding weight to our eyelids we eventually slept.


Crossing Borders: USA to Mexico

Her round beach ball sized face suddenly became pale. Looking up from her computer
screen she had found something disagreeable as her widening eyes were now two giant
pools of fear.

She mumbled something about a printing problem and made a hasty exit with Alicia’s
passport.

4am, La Guardia airport, New York.

This was not the first time issues had arose when Alicia or her family had tried to enter
or exit their home nation of the U.S.A. Having Haddad as a surname comes with certain
unwanted baggage. Haddad, a Middle Eastern name, meaning and as common as
[Black] Smith, had been flagged by the United States government as a threat to their
nation’s security. So, to save a nation from all Haddads, the surname had been added to
the terrorist watch list.


Red Links, 07-10-10

KAL's Cartoon, 07-08-10This week’s editorials admonish the various culprits, i.e., President Sarkozy, IPCC, justly. I chose the quickest summary of the East Anglia emails scandal conclusions because brevity accentuates how ridiculously tedious the slander campaign really was. But, The Economist missed a chance to admonish another culprit in every case: US. I mean, how long can readers of The Economist, for one, persist in such blithering naivete? I can forgive non-subscribers. But, most educated readers with at least two years of elementary school on their resume should know the difference between the bluster of public life and the earnestness of the private.


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