Korean Phrases

Korean Phrases Ep. 38: 금상첨화

This week we have a new "Korean Phrases" video, and we're going to be learning another useful idiom from 한자 (Chinese characters used in Korean).

We'll be learning about the idiom 금상첨화.

Check out the video below!

The post Korean Phrases Ep. 38: 금상첨화 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.


How to Say ‘Nice to Meet You’ in Korean

First impressions are so important. That first meeting can often shape other people’s perspective of your forever!

Let’s make sure that they have a great impression of you by learning to say ‘nice to meet you’ in Korean. This small phrase will not only show that you have great manners, but also that you enjoyed meeting your new friend, acquaintance, or potential future romantic partner.

Below, we’ll show you the various ways to say ‘nice to meet you’ in Korean.


Christmas in Korea: What Is It Like?

Christmas in Korea is very different from Christmas in North America or Europe. There are some superficial similarities, such as Christmas decorations in shop windows, but look beyond that and the differences become very apparent.

The good news is that Christmas is a national holiday in Korea. That means that if you work in an office, school, or factory that isn’t owned by the local scrooge, then you are likely to have the day off.

Unlike many Asian countries, a large proportion of Koreans are Christian, which explains why the day is a national holiday. It also means that there are special Christmas services in churches around the country.

However, Christmas isn’t one of Korea’s big traditional holidays like Seollal or Chuseok, so there isn’t a mad rush of everybody trying to make it back to his or her hometown for Christmas.


How to Say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean

Ready to celebrate Christmas in Korea?

Or maybe bring Korea to your Christmas?

You’ve come to the right place!

Christmas is a national holiday in Korea and you will see Christmas decorations and Christmas trees around Seoul during the festive period. Learning how to say ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean is pretty straightforward so be sure to wish all of your Korean friends a merry Christmas!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Formal ‘Merry Christmas’ in Korean

1. 행복한 크리스마스 되십시오 (haeng-bok-han keu-ri-seu-ma-seu dwi-ship-shi-o)

This is the formal way of saying ‘Merry Christmas’ since it has the –십시오 ending. You might see this on signs, posters, or cards. You can safely use it with all groups of people and nobody will get offended.

행복하다 = happy, blissful


How to Say ‘Happy New Year’ in Korean

Ready to try out your Korean skills while you bring in the new year? We’ll show you how!

Before we get into that, a few important things to go over related to New Year’s in Korea.

Firstly, Korea has two New Year celebrations. On January 1st, there is the celebration of the Solar New Year, 신정 (Sin-jeong). That is the celebration covered in this article.

However, in late January or early February, Koreans celebrate the Lunar New Year, 구정 (Gu-jeong), by having a large holiday known as 설날 (Seollal). During Seollal, people usually visit their hometown, eat 떡국 (Ddeok-gook) with their families, and visit their ancestors’ graves.

During the Solar New Year, people often spent time with their friends. In Central Seoul on New Year’s Eve, many people gather to hear the ringing of the bell in Jongno on the stroke of midnight.


20 Enlightening Korean Proverbs and Sayings

Looking for inspiration? You’ve come to the right place!

Ancestors have passed down their wisdom in Korea for centuries through their traditional Korean proverbs, and over the years Korean sayings and idiomatic expressions which have links to Western adages have come into common use.


How to Write Korean New Year’s Resolutions

Happy New Year, or 새해복 많이 받으세요 (that’s how we say Happy New Year in Korean)!

Sure, the end of the year is a great for partying, drinking and having fun with out families and friends. But each new year brings its own challenges and personal goals, and it’s that time of year to ready ourselves for self-improvement! That’s right, now that the holiday season is behind us, it’s time to pledge how we plan to better ourselves and set our New Year’s resolutions – in Korean!

So get ready to sit back, evaluate what you have done during the past year and what you plan to change in the year to come.


Korean Drama Phrases for Learning Korean

One fun and interesting way to study Korean is by watching Korean dramas.

Certain phrases appear in dramas more often than in other formats. Also, certain slang words become popularized by their use in a drama and have since become a more common part of everyday Korean lexicon.

For example the word 미생 (incomplete-life) was originally a term used in the Korean game 바둑 (Go!). Now it has become a popular word to describe the Korean office environment due to the drama (and manhwa) of the same name.

This article looks at some of the more common Korean drama phrases, and how to use them outside of dramas.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 


Korean Phrases Ep. 37: 설상가상

This week we have a new "Korean Phrases" video, and we're going to be learning another useful idiom from 한자 (Chinese characters used in Korean).

We'll be learning about the idiom 설상가상.

Check out the video below!

The post Korean Phrases Ep. 37: 설상가상 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.


How to Say ‘Happy Birthday’ in Korean

One day that is special for everyone is his or her birthday. It’s an important day to celebrate, so make sure you mark your calendars!

But how do we say ‘Happy Birthday’ in Korean?

Not only will we explain that phrase, but we’ll also teach you the famous Happy Birthday song!

Let’s get to it.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘Happy Birthday’ in Korean Explanation

First, let’s start with the word ‘birthday’ itself. ‘Birthday’ is one of those special Korean words that have an honorific version of the word, which is used when talking to people about generation (or more) older than you.

Some other nouns with this honorific form include ‘age’, and ‘house’. Some verbs with an honorific form include ‘to exist’, ‘to eat’, and ‘to sleep’.


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