Business/Economy

The Correct Use of Internet Restriction

Nosiest GovernmentsThe ROK looks relatively less nosy and restrictive an internet society, at least according to The Economist‘s Daily Chart on “Governments’ Content-Removal and Information Requests?. The United States infringes liberty

on both counts, scoring badly on both counts. Brazil, however, looks positively negative, topping both, but is it?.


Punishment Without Pain, Backfilling With Impunity

What looks like Japan’s principled stance against the Iranian nuclear program turns out tobe rather lame.

Japan’s new sanctions include a freeze on the assets of scores of groups and individuals linked to the country’s nuclear programme.

They ban the provision of insurance or reinsurance services to Iran and bar Japanese financial institutions from buying bonds issued by Iran’s central bank.

The new ban on financial activity with 15 designated Iranian banks that could contribute to nuclear activities could affect some Japanese banks, analysts said.

Toyota Motor Corp has suspended motor vehicle exports to the country indefinitely since June.

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Regulating Suggestiveness

Hyun Ah from the Kpop group “4Minute” dances on a chair, wearing short black shorts. (Yonhap News Agency)I’m not even going to be shy about it – Hyun Ah is about as pretty as a Vegas whore. But, the real doucbebags are the producers and the editors of this Hankyoreh infomercial for suggestiveness.

Emphasis on the sexy code leads to cases of forced exposure.


Red Links, 8-26-10

Teaching English?The topic of resource wars has become a continuing fascination for me in my grad studies. The topic combines war and three of my favorite things, food, water, and cheap electricity. So, KNOC looking for oil gets my attention. But, so does Brazil and America’s ebbing power. The Economist has taken a principled stance, that neither Democrat nor Republican knows much about the state of the world economy. Finally, how much military force do advanced states need?


August Links Dump

Teaser: the hypocrisy of praising sex, Noynoy’s follies, the entertaining Koreas, nuclear Japan, and Tyler Cowen defending Bruce Cumings


Selling What Japan, Inc. Has Left

It’s not that I don’t think geopolitical fears of Beijing’s rise are driving Tokyo’s drive to sign civilian nuclear deals with India, but that Joshua Keating talks about everything but Japan, Inc.’s pressure to compete against its foreign rivals. And, why make hay of anti-nuclear sentiment in Japan; can it really stop a deal?

Japan’s willingness to cooperate on nuclear energy with India is a pretty good indication of how China’s military and economic rise has changed the equation for its neighbors.

The very article Keating produces is mostly about international corporate competition in the nuclear industry, not about nukes.


How Science Is Done in America

I’ve always regretted not taking more biology and chemistry classes in college. But, now, this lowly Poli Sci major knows better how scientific fact is made in America.

…[P]rior to the May 2009 study, the National Cancer Institute had also performed a preliminary study that linked formaldehyde to leukemia, but members of Congress including Sens. James Inhofe, R-Okla., and David Vitter, R-La., managed to delay the EPA from officially designating the chemical as a “known carcinogen.”

(The EPA in June, however, released a draft assessment [3] of formaldehyde that supports that designation, but it’s not yet official.)


Seeing the Benefits Even in a Pest

How should a country respond to a biological invader that reaches its shores via cargo shipped as international trade?

A host of international trade agreements address the growing problem of biological invasions, including those of the World Trade Organization.

The WTO, which was formed in 1995, promotes free trade among its 153 members. It acknowledges that its members may legitimately restrict trade for reasons that include protection of human, animal or plant health from pests, diseases, toxins and other contaminants.


Beijing Buys ROK Treasury Bonds

Here’s another reason to be cautiously optimistic this morning. China starts to change the game with a move into South Korean treasury debt.

The news that China has been buying South Korean treasury debt as a way of diversifying its foreign reserves will come as music to the ears of the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

The bank has been in the forefront of efforts to persuade Asian governments to invest more of their vast surpluses in Asian assets rather than accumulate ever more bonds US and EU bonds. The Asian Bond Fund which is traded in Hong Kong jumped nearly 1 percent on this news.


Our Monkey Cousins Join the Pox Wars

I want to cheer the news, that U.S. military brings scientists closer to Ebola cure.

Yesterday, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and a private firm, AVI BioPharma, published the results of studies that show that their treatment does have a helpful effect in monkeys. That’s a huge leap, particularly since the researchers were given clearance to start limited human testing. The partnership won a Defense Department grant of up to $291 million last month for that phase.


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