africa

Alkibar

I was just listening to some fine piano music written by my friend Joe Cough and it made me think of how I’d never gotten around to writing a review of one of my absolute favorite albums, one I’ve been coming back to again and again for many years now.


“Even the small leopard is called leopard.” – Kenyan Proverb

I know this is MyKOREAQuest, but I have been thinking a lot lately about my semester abroad in Kenya. This is partly because I was there exactly 4 years ago (& I call myself a ‘recent grad’ – pfff!) and also because I am thinking about what’s to come in 2013. Okay, enough with the small talk, let me tell you about this one time I was almost eaten by a leopard somewhere in Tanzania…


Morgan Tsvangirai, not the EU, should have Won the Nobel Peace Prize

Tsvangirai_2285903b

The EU? Over a guy regularly facing down death-threats, bullying, and intimidation from one of the worst dictators on earth? Boo to the Nobel Committee for missing this obvious choice.


For the Love of the Game….

courtesy of yahoo sports

When I was 6 years old, I suited up for my first little league baseball game. I’ll never forget it. My jersey was green with white trim on the collar and sleeves. My number was 6 and there was absolutely nothing better to me than getting my pants as covered in dirt as humanly possible. Win or lose, playing baseball was a time in my childhood that I will never forget.


from an accident in africa to ankle acupuncture in korea

It seems only fitting that the ankle I broke in Africa would finally find comfort in my next home away from home – Korea. The last time I was abroad I comically fractured my right ankle during my medical orientation (at a hospital!) in Kenya. The break made for quite an experience and a tearful/choked up call home to my mom after a panicked evening in a Nairobi hospital. I was put in a cast and advised by my parents to seek surgical consultation when I returned to the states 5 months later in December.  I was studying abroad with 16 other students in the St. Lawrence University Kenya Semester Program. This injury sidelined me a bit from the Kenya experience, but a few weeks later I managed to haul my walking cast clumsily down a muddy dirt lane to my rural home-stay in Kenya’s Kericho Valley.


With Friends Like These…

In this Jan. 23 photo, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Il talks with Naguib Sawiris, executive chairman of Cairo-based Orascom Telecom, at an undisclosed place in North Korea. Kim held talks with the Egyptian telecoms magnate whose company set up and operates an advanced mobile phone network in the impoverished communist nation.…Is there any reason to keep any Egyptian government official in power? Beijing and Pyongyang have “lips and teeth”, but Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak and North Korea’s Kim Jong-il have ballistic missile sales, according to Don Kirk.


Israelis Dissing Obama

I love it when the Israelis and Americans fall out amid mutual recriminations.

The mood at the 11th annual Herzliya conference, where Israel’s top policymakers come to debate strategy and diplomacy with invited international experts, is understandably twitchy. The events in Egypt hang over the conference like the threatening grey clouds. And yesterday those clouds unleashed a savage hailstorm, in the form of a stinging attack on the Netanyahu government by Tzipi Livni, the former foreign minister who now leads Israel’s fragmented opposition. Nobody here claims that they saw the upheaval in Egypt coming, and few think that President Hosni Mubarak’s regime will be replaced by one that Israel will find anything like as easy to live with.


Obama’s Squishiness Is Now a Trend

After wimping out on Egypt, is the Obama administration now selling out Darfur

Bashir’s speech today gets Southern Sudan over one big hurdle toward declaring independence, which it is expected to formally do this July. The next test for U.S. pressure and Sudanese diplomacy is whether an equally congenial atmosphere will accompany talks over tricky issues such as border delineation and the sharing of Sudan’s oil.


Red Links, 2-5-11

It’s an all-Africa edition. I’m just as fascinated by South Sudan’s sovereignty as I am by Cairo’s protests.

Egypt Rises Up:

For some in the West, which has tended to put stability above democracy in its dealings with the Middle East, these developments are disturbing. Now that the protests have sucked the life out of Mr Mubarak’s regime, they argue, the vacuum will be filled not by democrats but by chaos and strife or by the Muslim Brothers, the anti-Western, anti-Israeli opposition. They conclude that America should redouble its efforts to secure a lengthy “managed transition” by shoring up either Mr Mubarak or someone like him.


Democracy vs. Jim Pinkerton in Egypt

I must say I really don’t know WTF Jim Pinkerton is talking about, but I’m willing to give him his say. Between David Corn’s optimistic view on the Egyptian protests and Pinkerton’s, I would side with Corn’s. But then, I would also be cautious about predicting the future.

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