writing

Letter from Ireland, August 2013

Dunboyne, Ireland
16 August, 2013

Dear Korea

Negativity is an often attractive topic. It’s in our nature to be critical, to find issue with what is at fault, and even when we are happy we still find reasons to complain. This isn’t exclusive to any particular situation or condition, everyone does it in some manner or form. There may be some explanation to it, but that is not my aim today.

I wanted to write today about something which has being an increasing source of bother for some time, and since I am now in Ireland I thought it would be appropriate to reflect on it from a particular standpoint.


I Feel Like A Big Deal

Hey, I’m feeling half self-important in a kind of ecstatic kind of way.

Someone went out of their way to nominate me Blog Awards Ireland 2013 in the Best Blog of the Irish Diaspora (or something like that) category. It’s, like, amazing and stuff. Thing is I’m lumped in with about sixty other blogs, including the Irish Times Generation Emigration blog (which I don’t think is fair as it’s this person’s JOB!), and other wonderful blogs like Kate Katharina, and of course Paju‘s finest WHATAWAYGOOK (yes, I often wonder if all the capitals are necessary but then again if you met the author…).


Let’s wrap this up?


The Ecstasy of Reading (Flaubert)

Pieter_Bruegel_(Temptation_of_St_Antony)

If you have ever felt, upon reading some comment or review that complains about too much description in a given book, or too many difficult words, a feeling of disgust—if you have ever suppressed an urge to roll your eyes when someone you know wonders about the point of fiction, or dismisses entire genres out of hand—then you must stop reading this blog post right now and go devour The Temptation of St. Anthony.


A Sample Chapter From Sorabol


The Trailer For My New Ebook


Interview with Rob Whyte, Lonely Planet Korea author

Anyone who travels and writes has at some point thought about being a travel writer. For most of us, that dream remains confined to diaries, blogs, local websites, and missives to our friends and family back home, but some itinerant scribes of course do make the leap to professional travel writing. Rob Whyte is an instructor at Busan University of Foreign Studies, and he’s also been a part-time travel writer for about the past ten years. He co-authored editions six, seven, and eight of the Lonely Planet Korea guidebooks, and has a host of other travel-related writing to his credit, including other upcoming Lonely Planet publications on ethnic food.


Videos from Busan KOTESOL Symposium on Fluency


On April 13, 2013, the Busan-Gyeongnam Chapter was pleased to present a special symposium on Fluency.
There were four presentations on Fluency, each focusing on a different language skill area. Videos are below and more informormation about the Busan-Gyeongnam chapter of KOTESOL at: http://koreatesol.org/busan
 


Letter from Korea, April 2013

Suwon, South Korea
April, 2013

Dear Ireland,

I’m not sure if I should gloat but I thought I’d mention the fact that spring is in full swing here. I should also point out that that was an unintentional rhyme  but I digress. Yes, April is warming the bones and joints enough for me not to dread the walk to work, and I am optimistically eyeing the month of May on the calendar in the kitchen. The shorts and t-shirts shall be dusted down soon.

We love spring here in Korea. It’s full of things to be happy about, such as the end of winter, but also the cacophony of blossoms which explode bit by bit throughout April. Right now we’ve bright yellow kenari decorating the sides of the roads, and slowly the purple azaelas and bulbous magnolias are breaking free. Of course the nation awaits the arrival of the cherry blossoms and the plethora of festivals that accompany them.


Is it Safe in South Korea on worldirish.com

I was asked to write an op-ed by worldirish.com, a news website from Ireland which connects stories and activities of Irish interest from around the world, about the ongoing crisis between South Korea and North Korea. Most importantly, they were interested in the situation here and the international media’s response.

20130406-110927.jpg

The line which divides North and South Korea at Panmounjeom.

While I believe I carry the same opinion as many expats, and even experts here, my biggest concern at the moment is that I am not wrong about what I wrote. I wouldn’t be alone in this regard.

Here’s the article:


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