what the book

Where to Buy English Books in Korea

Winter is coming in Korea and it’s a great time to snuggle up with a few new books. This past January I made a goal to read 35 books in 2014, and I can finally see the finish line! I’ve read 26 books so far, so that leaves 9 more to go in under 2 months. That’s a lot of reading, so I decided to order some new books to motivate me to reach my goal.

I ordered them from What the Book, the popular used book store in the Itaewon neighborhood of Seoul. Many of you have probably heard of or visited the store, but you may not know that you can also order books from their online store and have them delivered to you anywhere in Korea! Even if you’re looking for a specific book they don’t have, What the Book can order it for you online and send it to you.


Kelby Training

Recently, on one of the many Facebook groups that I read, someone was asking about Kelby Training. They were wondering if it was worth the money or not. In short, I believe it is… if you want to commit to learning and the time.

Disclaimer: Kelby Training did not pay me for this post. I am merely posting it to help direct people over that way who are considering getting a subscription. They have not given me anything to say these nice things, I am just saying them because I am extremely satisfied with their courses and online training.

What I mean by this is if you are just looking for some quick tips, they have those but the real value for you is in the courses that are  designed like a real photography course with materials to download and step-by-step instruction. It takes some time, often a few hours to get through each of the courses and you really start to see the value in it.


Itaewon freedom!

Haters gonna hate, but over the course of 11 months, I have grown quite fond of this magical place that has real cheese, hummus and other cherished items from home. Only a short subway ride and you arrive in a place with actual diversity, English speaking Starbucks baristas and "big sizes" for all!  I am not, however, a fan of the late nights there, a bit TOO different for this Korean acclimated drinker, but during the daytime I enjoy strolling along the crowded, ethnic streets, people watching to my hearts desire ( it is a prime spot for my psychology major hobby.) Itaewon gets a bad rap for some foreigners in Korea, for others, it is the only place they can imagine going, for me, the old phrase "it's a nice place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there" comes to mind.

Vital Visits in Itaewon

The Itaewon and Hongdae districts of Seoul are areas that most foreigners will come to see as a sort of 'holy city' during their time in South Korea. Most Korean cities or towns are not without Western conveniences such as a few fast food joints, one or two grossly overpriced designer clothes stores, and cinemas showing Western movies in English - but for a truly homesickness inducing day, a visit to the area really is necessary.

 

A walk through Itaewon's crowded streets is one of the rare occasions in Korea where you don't feel like a minority (the other being the Mud Festival). You're likely to see a lot more Westerners in the crowds here, and for a moment it's easy to forget that you're at the heart of Korea's largest city.

 


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