muslim brotherhood

Israelis Dissing Obama

I love it when the Israelis and Americans fall out amid mutual recriminations.

The mood at the 11th annual Herzliya conference, where Israel’s top policymakers come to debate strategy and diplomacy with invited international experts, is understandably twitchy. The events in Egypt hang over the conference like the threatening grey clouds. And yesterday those clouds unleashed a savage hailstorm, in the form of a stinging attack on the Netanyahu government by Tzipi Livni, the former foreign minister who now leads Israel’s fragmented opposition. Nobody here claims that they saw the upheaval in Egypt coming, and few think that President Hosni Mubarak’s regime will be replaced by one that Israel will find anything like as easy to live with.


Red Links, 2-5-11

It’s an all-Africa edition. I’m just as fascinated by South Sudan’s sovereignty as I am by Cairo’s protests.

Egypt Rises Up:

For some in the West, which has tended to put stability above democracy in its dealings with the Middle East, these developments are disturbing. Now that the protests have sucked the life out of Mr Mubarak’s regime, they argue, the vacuum will be filled not by democrats but by chaos and strife or by the Muslim Brothers, the anti-Western, anti-Israeli opposition. They conclude that America should redouble its efforts to secure a lengthy “managed transition” by shoring up either Mr Mubarak or someone like him.


The Spurious Iranian Bogeyman in Cairo

Haroon Moghul makes several good points about why Americans should at least not fear either revolution in Egypt or the Muslim Brotherhood.

The rest of the conversation is excellent. I would also point to Moghul’s essay distinguishing the 1979 Iranian revolution from the protests in Cairo.

Powered by ScribeFire.


Listen! The Pharaohs Are Laughing!

 An Egyptian boy holds a megaphone while chanting anti-government slogans in Tahrir Square the afternoon of January 31, 2011 in central Cairo, Egypt. Protests continued unabated in Cairo January 31, as thousands marched to demand the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarek. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)  Continue reading at NowPublic.com: Egypt Protests In Cairo | NowPublic Photo Archives http://www.nowpublic.com/world/egypt-protests-cairo-1#ixzz1ClfYjrfj“‘We want a leader who has used public transportation.’” (The Second World, p. 201) Put that on a placard!


Syndicate content
 

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds 
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group