learn korean

Learn Korean in 2016: 90 Day Korean Roundup

2015 was another fantastic year in the world of Korean learning and we can’t thank our readers enough for all the support, comments and wonderful feedback! 

In the past year, we’ve seen our lessons and teachings reach more and more students in many new countries and we’ve had new members join our Inner Circle from Israel, Switzerland, Singapore, Indonesia and many other countries! Our students and readers are amazing and we appreciate every single one of you.

Our paid Korean course launched a third 90-day module this year, and the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive as we’ve had a cohort of students go through the entire course and learn Korean to an intermediate level. We look forward to building onto our course in the next year and giving our learners more and more learning materials.


Korean Drama Phrases for Learning Korean

One fun and interesting way to study Korean is by watching Korean dramas.

Certain phrases appear in dramas more often than in other formats. Also, certain slang words become popularized by their use in a drama and have since become a more common part of everyday Korean lexicon.

For example the word 미생 (incomplete-life) was originally a term used in the Korean game 바둑 (Go!). Now it has become a popular word to describe the Korean office environment due to the drama (and manhwa) of the same name.

This article looks at some of the more common Korean drama phrases, and how to use them outside of dramas.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 


How to Say ‘Good Morning’ in Korean

It’s always good to start off the day on a positive note.

One easy way to do that is with a nice, polite, friendly “good morning”.

But how can we say “good morning” in Korean?

In most situations, you can just use ‘hello‘ instead of saying ‘good morning’ when speaking Korean. However, if you want to specifically say ‘good morning’ instead of ‘hello’, then you’ll want to know these phrases.

Onward we go!

 


How to Say ‘Happy Birthday’ in Korean

One day that is special for everyone is his or her birthday. It’s an important day to celebrate, so make sure you mark your calendars!

But how do we say ‘Happy Birthday’ in Korean?

Not only will we explain that phrase, but we’ll also teach you the famous Happy Birthday song!

Let’s get to it.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘Happy Birthday’ in Korean Explanation

First, let’s start with the word ‘birthday’ itself. ‘Birthday’ is one of those special Korean words that have an honorific version of the word, which is used when talking to people about generation (or more) older than you.

Some other nouns with this honorific form include ‘age’, and ‘house’. Some verbs with an honorific form include ‘to exist’, ‘to eat’, and ‘to sleep’.


How to Say ‘OK’ in Korean

As you know, the word ‘OK’ has several different meanings in English.

It can mean ‘yes’.

It can also mean that something is sufficient or ‘not bad’.

Likewise, when looking at how to say ‘OK’ in Korean, there are several different words that we can use depending on the type of ‘OK’ that we want to say.

Are you ‘OK’ to jump right into it? Here we go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘OK’ as in ‘yes’

If you want to say OK as in ‘yes’, then you can simply use the Korean word for yes. You can also use the word ‘to know’.

To show how these are used, you can read the conversation below. In the conversation, ‘A’ is giving a direction and ‘B’ is saying ‘OK’ two different ways.

 


How to Say ‘I’m Hungry’ in Korean

Is your stomach grumbling? Did you skip lunch?

Then you’re going to need to know how to say ‘I’m hungry’ in Korean!

Let’s jump right into it.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

‘Hungry’ vs. ‘Full’ in Korean

When talking about whether you are hungry or not, two different adjectives are used.

In front of each adjective is the word 배 (bae), which means ‘stomach’. To say that you are hungry, you add the adjective 고프다 (go-puh-da) to make 배 고프다.

Strictly speaking, the particle ‘가’ (ga) should come after ‘배’ to make ‘배가 고프다’. However, when speaking, people drop this particle.


Top 10 Korean Jokes

Ready for some laughs?

Here’s a list of some of the top Korean jokes. Most of them are a mix of Korean and English, so it helps if you know at least some basic Korean.

We’ve also tossed in some pictures to help you remember these Korean jokes more easily.

If you can’t read Hangul (the Korean Alphabet) yet, you can download a free guide here and be reading in about 60 minutes.

Let the games begin!

Caution: Don’t drink milk while reading these jokes. There’s a high chance that milk will shoot out from your nose from laughter!

Korean Joke #1Korean joke beans

Q: What is the biggest bean in the world?


How to Say ‘I Don’t Know’ in Korean

We all like to know the answer to questions. It makes us feel helpful, knowledgeable, and in control.

However, there will always be times when we don’t know the answer to something. In those cases, it’s best to tell the truth and say, “I don’t know”. The other person will respect your honesty!

Today, we will explain how to say, “I don’t know” in Korean.

On your marks, get set, go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 

Root Verb for ‘I Don’t Know’

There are two verbs we’re going to compare today. They are opposites: One is quite knowledgeable, and one is a bit ignorant.

Ready to meet them?


How to Say ‘Excuse Me’ in Korean

Saying ‘excuse me’ in Korean is more of an adventure than you might expect!

The phrase used depends on the situation, the speaker, and the listener. Once you consider these three factors, you will know how to say ‘excuse me’ in Korean naturally. Therefore, it is important that you listen and observe Korean life to get a feeling of how different words are used.

Here are the ways to say ‘excuse me’ in Korean.

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

 


How to Say ‘Goodnight’ in Korean

Let’s talk about how to say “goodnight’ in Korean.

Although several phrases will be taught in this lesson, it may be best to pick one formal and one less formal expression and practice trying to use those expressions as much as possible.

In addition to knowing how to say ‘goodnight’, you may wish to use the expression ‘see you tomorrow’ (내일 봐요 – nae-il bwa-yo) in certain situations too.

Here we go!

*Can’t read Korean yet? Click here to learn for free in about 60 minutes!

Formal ‘Goodnight’ in Korean

1. 안녕히 주무세요 (an-nyeong-hee joo-moo-se-yo)

If you have studied ‘How to Say Goodbye in Korean‘, then you will be aware of the word 안녕히 (peacefully) already.


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