family mart

Defending the Lady’s Honor

by Mr. Motgol

Ha-bin was always a messy drunk. Every time she went out she got catastrophically hammered. British chick wasted. A weaving, incoherent puddle of babble and drool. But unlike a British chick, Ha-bin wasn’t tall and brawny, with ancient, boozy Viking blood pumping through her veins. Instead, she was a small Korean woman with zero natural tolerance for alcohol. As a result, every time she touched the stuff she turned into a chaotic wreck. You could set your watch to it.


Surviving Your First Month in Korea

 

That first month after taking a new job in South Korea can be one of the hardest. It's not just that you're adjusting to a new country and a new job, but you're also going to be living on whatever meager savings you brought with you until that magical first pay check comes in. If you've been responsible and saved some cash for the occasion - your $1500 or so will be more than enough. If you're like me and come over on a whim, you might be trying to stretch $800 or so. That's definitely doable, but here are a few tips for making that money last while still having a good time.

Most Korean jobs pay monthly, so you're going to need to make that money last for at least four weeks. Thankfully Korea is a really cheap place to live, so with the tips below you'll be right.


Top 10 Things to Love About Korea

 

For those contemplating the leap that is teaching English in South Korea, there's plenty of documentation out there to highlight the big picture draws of the country and the career. You know about the good money, the free accommodation, and the fact you can use South Korea as a launching pad into South East Asia - so here are the ten small pleasures that I've picked as reasons I love being in Korea again.


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