expat slang

Expat slang, part 3

Why a part 3? Because slang is always being created. Check out part 1 and part 2 if you need a few more.

bus ballet (n.) – that delicate dance people do when standing on the bus and hanging onto the handles, all the while hanging onto 2 bags of groceries or a manbag.

A: Dude, are you OK standing up on the bus?

B: Sure, no problem – I got this bus ballet down.


Expat slang, part 2

Since the first expat slang post, a few new phrases of expat slang have been overheard. Add what you know and enjoy!

Keyboard condom (n.) – the thin, plastic-film-like plastic cover found on Korean keyboards. Often taken off the keyboard by Westerns more interested in typing than fighting with a piece of plastic.

I can’t type nearly as fast with the keyboard condom on.

Typing with a keyboard condom is like typing with rubber gloves on.

Hongdae Standard Time (n.) – the hour to hour-and-a-half difference between the scheduled start time and actual start time of a Hongdae concert. See also Itaewon Standard Time; other versions are heard around the world.


Current Korean slang amongst expats

UPDATED x2 21 Dec 2010 with another big one.

UPDATED 10 Dec 2010 - a hat tip to the commenters for remembering some I forgot!

So what if the Korean language is not your first language? You can still use it in a way that's probably not used by the locals. These are the examples I've heard - or used - of recent:

chunner: referring to a 1,000 (cheon) won bill.

Do you have a chunner?

Give me a chunner and I'll buy you a Coke.

manner: referring to a 10,000 (man) won bill. Pronounced 'mahn-ner'.

Give me a manner and we'll call it even.


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