EPIK

Getting Cold Feet

tumblr_nfb7535Tbv1sp1jbao1_500Leaving behind everything that is safe and familiar to move across the world is a big decision, not to be made lightly. The list of pros and cons can seem endless, but it’s important to consider them all so you can make the right choice for yourself. After all, there’s only one thing worse than getting cold feet after you’ve already taken the plunge…and that is…actually getting cold feet!


Have Yourself a Korean Little Christmas

IMG_1782Merry Christmas from Korea! Besides a few twinkling roundabout decorations and lights hanging from windows of major shopping malls, Ulsan unfortunately doesn’t offer much in the way of holiday spirit. However, Busan is a whole different story!


Work Hard, Play Harder

 

When it comes to countries with the best work-life balance, Korea is not exactly at the top of list. Compared to the international average of 1,765 hours, Koreans spend 2,090 hours at work per year; which amounts to approximately 8 additional 40-hour work weeks. They log long hours, and vacations are few and far between. As a result, less time is spent each day on activities devoted to personal health and well-being, family, and leisure.

That being said, when Koreans do finally get the chance to break away from their desks and let loose, they don’t hold back.  A typical night out with friends or co-workers often involves 5+ hours of non-stop food, merry conversation, and a grand finale of glorious singing, all of which is fluidly connected by an endless stream of alcohol. Think of it this way: if a bar crawl and an all-you-can-eat buffet had a baby and named it Karaoke, you’d have yourself a standard Korean night on the town.


Yangsan Half Marathon

10857351_10152678507844864_3864319031194187068_o

Ran the Yangsan Half Marathon today in 1:36:24! Not sure what I’m most excited about: my time, my shiny new medal, or the carton of raw eggs I received in my finisher’s goodie bag. #onlyinKorea


Vlog Entry #11: Fall School Festival

Each year, on a Friday in October or November, public schools all over Korea host something known as Sports Day or School Festival. Students spend the day playing games (or in my school’s case, trying a bunch of different sports) and making crafts. Meanwhile, the teachers retreat to the adult cafeteria to enjoy a variety of tasty Korean dishes and several bottles of rice wine. Then, in the afternoon, everyone gathers to watch group after group of students perform their favorite songs and dances.


Progress Report


Sneak Peek Korea – Halloween Madness!

Sneak Peek Korea is a video series in which I made videos into all the extra footage I get that doesn’t make it into a proper video, and is largely unedited! I film a lot of my life and want to share as much as I can with you, because you seem to like it! :) Before I would just scrap extra footage I didn’t think was good enough for it’s own video, but I hope to instead provide little sneak peeks of my life in Korea, unscripted. Let me know in the comments if you enjoy these kinds of videos!


Tough TEFL Love


Vlog Entry #10: Imagine Your Korea Video Contest Submission

This is a video I entered in the 2014 Imagine Your Korea video contest! The winners will be announced on December 5th, so I’ll be sure to let you know if anything happens!



The Double Whammy

This past week marked my third full month living in South Korea, and nearly-third full month of teaching middle and high school ESL. Up until now, pretty much all of my blogging efforts have gone toward recounting the many wonderful, new and exciting things that I’ve seen and done. I’ve hiked some killer mountains and stood in awe of glorious views. I’ve biked to the beach and back, soaking up the sun in the Korean countryside. I’ve been to several festivals, gone


Syndicate content
 

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds 
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group