the economist

Israelis Dissing Obama

I love it when the Israelis and Americans fall out amid mutual recriminations.

The mood at the 11th annual Herzliya conference, where Israel’s top policymakers come to debate strategy and diplomacy with invited international experts, is understandably twitchy. The events in Egypt hang over the conference like the threatening grey clouds. And yesterday those clouds unleashed a savage hailstorm, in the form of a stinging attack on the Netanyahu government by Tzipi Livni, the former foreign minister who now leads Israel’s fragmented opposition. Nobody here claims that they saw the upheaval in Egypt coming, and few think that President Hosni Mubarak’s regime will be replaced by one that Israel will find anything like as easy to live with.


Placating Fools in Japan

http://hoppo-m-flip.go.jp/hoppo/kikaku/02.htmlIs this the price Japan’s PM Naoto Kan has to pay to overhaul Japan’s entitlements programs and combat the conservative farming lobbies?


Red Links, 2-5-11

It’s an all-Africa edition. I’m just as fascinated by South Sudan’s sovereignty as I am by Cairo’s protests.

Egypt Rises Up:

For some in the West, which has tended to put stability above democracy in its dealings with the Middle East, these developments are disturbing. Now that the protests have sucked the life out of Mr Mubarak’s regime, they argue, the vacuum will be filled not by democrats but by chaos and strife or by the Muslim Brothers, the anti-Western, anti-Israeli opposition. They conclude that America should redouble its efforts to secure a lengthy “managed transition” by shoring up either Mr Mubarak or someone like him.


Kaplan on the Middle Asian Lake

I can’t say I’ve always loved what Robert D, Kaplan has written, but I did enjoy what he says in this “Tea with Robert Kaplan” video (sorry, the video uploaded a bit oddly). I’m a bit skeptical about Beijing’s peaceful rise, though. Yet, I heartily agree that the key to American competitiveness in the region is to eschew territorial entanglements,

Here’s a link to Kaplan’s Monsoon. The video, though, is a much more compelling ad than this sensationalistic crap on the site.


Why Your First Love Is So Important

You Never Forget Your First LoveI still mourn for my Palm Tungsten E2. I never fully exploited its capabilities, but it left me with a 4.5 x3.1 x .59 inch handheld habit. It’s a relief to know someone else with more technical nous than I have still thinks smaller is a plus.


Red Links, 9-25-10

The EconomistIt’s the “China Lurking” edition. Whether it’s in Juba, Tokyo, or Pyongyang, or in the wallet and in the White House, Chinese actions in its backyard and farther abroad are stirring trouble. And, for Indians, comparisons with China are in the foreground because of the hash New Delhi is making of the Commonwealth Games. I’ve never thought highly of white elephant sporting events as economic engines, so I hope the Indians can end the fad altogether.

As for the Sino-Japanese row over goat-infested islands, I see no reason to change my opinion here.


Red Links, 9-16-10

After the Storm (The Economist)East Asia is becoming a more mature and complicated place, demographically, politically, and economically. And, it’s not all bad. There are real gains to applaud. Now, though, cranking out the successes is no longer like manufacturing. It’s marginally costly, whether it involves a currency, building a city, or keeping a military alliance.


Hitting an Income Wall of American Making (Video)


Red Links, 9-03-10

@AFP?The EconomistThis week os a pessimistic week for The Economist. For all the optimism Technology Quarterly brings, it’s the economic doubt raised about Beijing’s role in the world, warnings about the evolution of the internet, and anthropogenic global warming, that is most compelling.


The Correct Use of Internet Restriction

Nosiest GovernmentsThe ROK looks relatively less nosy and restrictive an internet society, at least according to The Economist‘s Daily Chart on “Governments’ Content-Removal and Information Requests?. The United States infringes liberty

on both counts, scoring badly on both counts. Brazil, however, looks positively negative, topping both, but is it?.


Syndicate content
 

Koreabridge - RSS Feeds 
Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

Koreabridge - Facebook Group