alcohol

Shopping {Vegan} in Busan – Alcohol

It’s the festive season and for many of us that means parties and alcohol. So to make it easier to live compassionately whilst enjoying yourself, I’ve collecting some tid-bits on vegan alcohol.


Soju Haiku


Order Soju Online

Are more than one haiku called haiki? I don’t think so, but I’m too drunk on soju to really care. Imo, another bottle, please! And you might want a few, too, before reading my haiku. (Is more than one bottle of soju called soji?)


Adorable Alcohol

Adorable Alcohol in Korea!  Newest will be added to the top! ♥

I saw this add in Hongdae for flavored Makgeolli rice wine (pineapple, kiwi, lemon, etc!)

I love flavored soju like this, but I wonder how 막걸리 tastes like this (O_o)


Ziggy Stardust's Noraebang

Last Friday, Workwick Franklin teachers new and old gathered together for a night of beef, beer, and general tomfoolery.  As a goodbye to the only Workwick Franklin teacher who finished his contract and is leaving Busan (at least for now), as well as to welcome the new Chicago couple (I swear the Windy City follows me around...and that's the way I like it), and celebrate the first week of the new school year- we went out.  Now nights in Korea can sometimes fall into a basic pattern: dinner, drinks in multiple locations, drunken singing- last weekend may have fit the bill, but was far from typical. 

First off we went for BBQ with a little something extra which I had never seen before- an omelet ring.

Letter from Korea, September 2011.

Suwon, Korea
23/9/2011

Dear Ireland,

You may not know this but Koreans are known as the Irish of the east. I didn’t know this until a while after I arrived here first in 2005. Of course, when I was young and heard the main reason why I thought it was great and I looked forward to challenging this accolade to the best of my ability; could Koreans out-drink me, a then twenty-three year old post-university drifter who had ended up in Korea with the promise of earning enough money to travel around the world. The fact that I never made it past Malaysia is beyond the point.

Of course, there are more reasons why Koreans are known as the Irish of the east than the fact that both countries are famous for the amount of alcohol that is consumed by their citizenry.


Mine’s a can of ‘ass, please!

Today, I am at Incheon International Airport – a wonderful place full of coming and going and, I imagine, Korea’s proud welcoming mat to the world.

 

It’s quite a lovely place and has been recognised so by some shower of cowboys  for its wonderfulness. I’m sure most people who read this who are in Korea are familiar with said ‘ness. Lots of glass and steel and luxury shopping (because everyone who flies wants a Fendi handbag).


12 Rules for Expat Life in Korea Contd.

Today has seen the Korean blogosphere dancing in the delights of this recent article of sorts on CNNgo.

Shocking stuff altogether.

Fortunately a few bloggers have jumped to protect Korea because Korea is such a wonderful perfect place that has never done anything wrong and shouldn’t be criticised for the realities its society presents. Grrrr. What I couldn’t get over was the general belief that this post was taken so seriously and the defence of Korea was so patriotic. So in defence of decency I will try to add my own flavour and sense of balance to this debate.

But first take a moment to read what has already been said:

Roboseyo: CNNgo Trolls Bloggers; 12 ACTUALLY useful tips for Expat life.

Re: 12 rules for expat life in Korea | Chris in South Korea – Travel and life in Korea.

12 Rules for Expats in Korea | David S. Wills.

Of course, no one here is right or wrong. It’s just … well… so what? As David S. Wills makes the point, anyone who reads the CNNgo post will – hopefully – realise that this is a little bit of jolly finger-pointing…at least I think that’s the point he made (I only had a few minutes to read so I read quickly, as in quicker than ‘scan’ reading).

Anyway, the balancing act courtesy of me. Drum rolls please!!!!

1. Learn to Drink Like a Fish – Yes, do! You’ll have a great time. Forget about how much Koreans drink – I don’t think most of these other bloggers have ever seen how much English teachers in Korea drink! And, on that point, I am assuming that the people who move to Korea are adults and can make their own decision as to how much they drink. My personal preference is to drink as much as I can and learn from your mistakes (I always try to smile and say please and thank you). I am assuming you, the reader, have strong enough self esteem to make your own decisions. 


Korean Hangover Cures: A Review (숙취해소음료)

If you have ever been in Korea, chances are you have been out drinking. And if you have ever been out drinking in Korea, chances are you've been offered a miracle hangover cure by one of your Korean drinking buddies. Now there are very few things in this world which I like more than a good old binge drinking and during my time in Korea, I've had the opportunity to put several of these remedies to the test.

Helping A Hangover: Prevention and Recovery

Koreans like to drink.
Soju, Tequila, Whiskey, Wine~ Pick your poison.
Unfortunately, there can be some negative side affects when you drink too much:
Bad Hangovers and a Red Face are two bad ones that come to mind.
 
This may not work for everyone, but here are some tips to prevent the horrible hangover, what do if you get a hangover, and how to prevent the dreaded Red Face while drinking.

    Beer-Soaked Politics

    Benjamin Franklin recounted in his Autobiography how he succeeded by avoiding beer while working at Watt’s Printing House in London.


    Syndicate content
     

    Koreabridge - RSS Feeds 
    Features @koreabridge     Blogs  @koreablogs
    Jobs @koreabridgejobs  Classifieds @kb_classifieds

    Koreabridge - Facebook Group